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The bar and restaurant at La Sastrería in Valencia by Masquespacio

The bar and restaurant at La Sastrería in Valencia by Masquespacio

Hospitality Design
Interior Design
News
02-11-2020
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Taking its inspiration from chef Sergio Giraldo and bartender Cristóbal Bouchet’s shared dream to open their own restaurant, La Sastrería is a wondrous establishment in Valencia, Spain, designed by local creative consultancy Masquespacio. As with most of Masquespacio’s endeavours, the aim of the La Sastrería project was to fulfill the ambitious vision of young entrepreneurs. In this instance, a hospitable duo who seek to spearhead new culinary and sensorial experiences in the local area.

Located in Canyamelar-Cabanyal, the maritime neighbourhood of Valencia, La Sastrería is divided into three main sections: a bar, restaurant and fish market. Masquespacio’s boundary-pushing design responses for the bar and restaurant, somewhat of a signature for the firm, are differentiated by the deft use of wall and floor tiles. A frenzy of custom-made patterned tiles dominate the bar zone while the dining room is awash with handmade clay and ceramic tiles in ocean-inspired tones.

La Sastrería bar and restaurant in Valencia, Spain

In the bar, almost every surface confidently displays a patchwork of high-octane patterns produced with tiles that reinterpret the similarly energetic facades of the neighbouring buildings. “Special attention has been given to the bar that looks like a facade on its own,” says the designers. “In the middle, the attention is centred on the selection of spirits that will be used for the cocktails, being the speciality from Cristóbal and La Sastrería.”

While the bar outwardly references the architectural characteristics of the surrounding neighbourhood, look a little further and, more subtly, the design also considers the way the locals live and the social interactions that sculpt the charm of the region. “We tried to recreate the habit from the neighbours in the interior through the reinterpretation of the plastic chairs they take from their homes to the streets,” says Ana Hernández, creative director at Masquespacio. “This represents the act of taking fresh air – tomar la fresca – during the warmest days, when the neighbours get on the streets and come together for a chit chat.”

La Sastrería bar and restaurant in Valencia, Spain
La Sastrería bar and restaurant in Valencia, Spain

Chef Sergio’s authentic local cuisine is the drawcard for the seafood-loving guests of the main dining room at La Sastrería. Here, the designers responded to the menu of ocean-focussed fare by creating a “huge wave” sculpture that builds momentum as it approaches the kitchen, culminating in a showpiece made of suspended ceramic pieces.

Elsewhere, an overflow of ocean-inspired hues floods the fit-out. “The floor of artisan ceramic [tiles] in white and blue makes us experience the division between the water and the sand of the sea, while the chairs designed for the space are a reference to the fishing boats,” says the designers. “We wanted to create a scene focused on the kitchen, submerging the whole restaurant as if you are in the middle of the sea,” adds Ana. “It’s pure fantasy, like Sergio’s dishes.”

masquespacio.com

La Sastrería bar and restaurant in Valencia, Spain
La Sastrería bar and restaurant in Valencia, Spain
La Sastrería bar and restaurant in Valencia, Spain

We wanted to create a scene focused on the kitchen, submerging the whole restaurant as if you are in the middle of the sea. It’s pure fantasy, like Sergio’s dishes.

Ana Hernández Creative director, Masquespacio

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